Are you home-locking your child

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Are-you-home-locking-your-child
Dr Shayama Chona
The time children spend indoors is increasing drastically. While we blame increasing
screen time and tech-evolution, panicky parents are one of the culprits

As parents, we are losing our sense of perspective. We tend to warn our children most about dangers which threaten them least and ignore those which are much more likely to do them harm. Are you home-locking your child Are you home-locking your child

We must be aware that parental neurosis is very harmful for their children. They are extremely sensitive to their parent’s panic and fear. We owe it to ourselves and to them to look at these issues calmly.

Our fear of the outside world is pushing children indoors, where ironically many risks are higher.

The problems of the ‘home-locked’ children can include;
  •  Almost constant adult supervision (which can delay development of independence)
  •  Long periods spent in front of a TV or computer screen (which can delay speech and social skills).
  •  Insufficient physical exercise (which increases the risk of becoming a couch potato).
  •  This is not a good preparation for a full and happy life.

Parents must recognize the prevalent dangers in ‘home grown’ kids. Let us be sensible about it – you are not doing kids any favours if they are always in the car and they do not learn to cross the road.

Parents, have to negotiate their own route between equipping children with the skills they need to stay safe and not restrict or terrify them un-necessarily in the process. It helps to give your child only the information she needs, as simple and clearly stated as possible.

If you are calm, your children are more likely to listen and remain calm themselves. Also try to check that your child has understood an issue fully by posing occasional questions.

Just as you would not simply tell a child how to cross a road or cut with scissors on her own, don’t presume she will know how to put your words into action in an emergency without a little practice.

I remember my father telling me as I left for my first NCC camp, saying something like ‘Ring me if anyone dares to touch a hair on your ‘head’.

I spent the next week wondering why anyone would want to touch hair and why he was so concerned about it all of a sudden.

Even when children are too young to comprehend or cope with the full facts surrounding a safety issue, there may still be a lot that parents can do to help equip and protect them.

Drugs education for young children, for example, worries many parents who fear a premature loss of children’s innocence and that increased awareness may fuel curiosity.

What young children need to know will vary according to their particular circumstances and experience and knowing what information to impart and what to withhold is a hard call for any parent.


I remember my father telling me as I left for my first NCC camp, saying something like ‘Ring me if anyone dares to touch a hair on your ‘head’. I spent the next week wondering why anyone would want to touch my hair and why he was so concerned about it all of a sudden


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